Music Producer Pro Review

This “Music Producer Pro” review is going to give you an unbiased and clear view of the informational product created by Jay Dynasty. The question of the day is: Will the Music Producer Pro lessons live up to its hype or is it just another useless product?

Before we go further, these music production lessons are unlike any other self-learning courses available on the internet today. It’s very clear that once you open it, it doesn’t briefly go over things you already know or gives you a few good teasers and then disappoints you. I personally don’t like to waste my time and hard earned money reading things that I could have just researched myself on the net.

So what exactly is the main purpose of these informational products? Learning techniques, secrets and some time saving tips are just some that come to the top of my head. There are a huge assortment of ebooks and self learning courses out there that tell us the same thing. Most are basically carbon copies of each other. Aren’t you tired of that? I don’t know about you, but I sure am.

Let’s get back on topic – the answer of the very first question: Is Music Producer Pro a product worth paying for? Is it full of useful secrets? Is it revolutionary? Will it help you be successful? Is it everything you need to start your career or pursue your hobby?

Well, if we are referring to secret techniques – it’s both a yes and a no. These lessons don’t just show you some techniques that you have never seen before, it presents them with a twist. It’s a new perspective – how to approach things in a different light. What you can literally guarantee is that you will be encouraged to put these under-used and well known techniques to use. So in a way, yes it’s revolutionary.

Inside you will find some great techniques that you were probably unaware of. That’s not surprising, considering Jay Dynasty has over 23 years experience in this field. The guides are super easy to follow and the video lessons are priceless.

The online lessons consist of powerful step by step studio lessons, 14 video lessons, a large collection of video / audio lessons and over 1000 documented resources. The author is well established and this package brings his vast experience to you in the comfort of your own home. Believe me – he knows his stuff.

With these powerful tools, you will learn how to produce music professionally. The great part of this system is the dynamic training videos that have been bundled into the package. This system is perfect if you want to learn how to produce rap or hip hop instrumentals by beat making or sampling. It doesn’t stop there though. Music Producer Pro is not just for rap, hip hop, dance or even techno. These lessons will work for literally all music genres out there. It even goes as far as helping you find your recording equipment for a lower cost.

I really wish I could give you more information but you will have the pleasure of discovering everything yourself. What I can definitely say is that you won’t be disappointed. These lessons are new, fresh, different and very efficient in getting the message across. Hundreds of people have already started reaping the rewards of using Music Producer Pro.

The History of Rock Music – Book Review

During the fifties and later, vital, energetic, and rebellious youth produced their own music in contrast to traditional music, becoming a target for censors and conservatism. When I saw this book with an Elvis-like drawing on its cover, I had to pick it up, because it reminded me of the times when most of us in my generation were, musically speaking, in love with Elvis and his successors.

The type of music called rock music sprung up from peacetime America but was adopted by the youth through the entire world. Although it started as an act of a rebellion, rock music became the governing music form for the next few decades, eventually turning into a customary music genre and leaving its throne of rebellion to other types of music. Rock music involves a vocal melody accompanied by musical instruments such as guitars, drums, and keyboard instruments.

When rhythm and blues met country music, rock music was born. The book, “The History of Rock Music,” gives this type of historical information alongside with the biographies of and information about famous rock stars who determined and shaped the course of rock music from early on. In addition to the musicians, Dick Clark with his television show “American Bandstand” promoted the rock music and coerced its respectability by the general population.

Among the earlier artists mentioned are Little Richard, Elvis, Buddy Holly, Woodie Guthrie, and Bob Dylan, and from the sixties on come the Beatles, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Motown, Jerry Garcia and The Grateful Dead, The Beach Boys, The Doors, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix. Later, when hard rock surfaced, its representatives became Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, and Black Sabbath. From seventies on, singer-songwriters came into the music scene like Jackson Browne, James Taylor, and Joni Mitchell.

The book not only gives information about music groups and presents several features from actual history, but it also provides details on the instruments and the evolution of rock music trends to the end of the nineties, from before Elvis’s time to Curt Cobain’s grunge.

“The History of Rock Music” is a volume from the Masters of Music Series, in hardcover and 64 pages, with ISBN-10: 0764151371 and ISBN-13: 9780764151378.

The author, Andrea Bergamini, has written other books on music like Beethoven and the Classical Age, Music of the World, and Le rock. Also, a great deal of appreciation goes to the book’s illustrator, Ivan Stalio, who has illustrated numerous volumes such as: The Atlas of World Religions, Adapting to the Environment, The Animal Atlas, The History of Technology, Life Cycles, Mammals, and Plants.

With its large pages filled with bright photos, graphics, and illustrations, this young adult book is a delightful book to read and enjoy for people of all ages.

Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music Review

I just recently finished reading the book, Ripped: How the Wired Generation Revolutionized Music. I’m kind of mad at myself for waiting so long to read it. It’s been in the “to read” pile for a long time and I just got around to reading it. It’s a fantastic look at the evolution of music over the past 20 years or so. From the rise of indie bands like Death Cab for Cutie and Bright Eyes, to Prince’s record label, to mp3’s and the “pay what you want” model introduced by Radiohead and NineInch Nail’s Trent Reznor.

I can’t honestly say that I remember much about my 7th grade history class. I couldn’t even tell you my teacher’s name, let alone what we “learned” that year. The one thing that I do remember is that there was a banner hanging above the chalk board. It read, “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”

If you are going to be a musician today, then you need to understand how the music industry has changed so that you can try to figure out where it’s headed. Sure it’s great to know about the writers in Tin Pan Alley from the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s; it’s important to understand radio’s role in the emergence of popular music and how payola controlled that; it’s important to know that the first video ever aired on MTV was The Buggle’s “Video Killed The Radio Star” (seriously think about that for a minute).

In the last 20 years, the music industry has changed more than it has in nearly its entire existence. Or, certainly in this century. The current music industry that we operate in is still changing at a rapid pace. There’s speculation on the extinction of CD’s within 2-3 years, there’s been a major resurgence in vinyl (who saw that coming?!), the major record labels as we knew them may cease to exist within 5 years, mp3’s and file sharing are now a good thing and a major source of world-wide distribution (what?!).

Greg Kott’s “Ripped” is one of the most fascinating books on current music history I’ve ever read. He jumps right in with the first chapter about the major consolidation that all of the big 5 (at that time there were 5 major record labels, as opposed to the 2 1/2 there are now). This was a huge shift in the record industry at the time. It scared a lot of artists and put a lot of people out of work.

Greg does a great job in detailing the consolidation of the majors, the rise of indie bands, the fight against and for sampling on hip-hip records and new mashup records and artists, Prince’s record label and his do-it-yourself approach, the rise of mp3’s and the fall of Napster and the “pay what you want” model that Radiohead started with “In Rainbows,” that Trent Renzor “improved” upon.

I don’t want to give too much away, because I want you to be able to enjoy this book. It isan enjoyable book. It discusses in detail the many things that have happened over the past two decades that have changed the face of the music industry dramatically.

You can read each chapter as a vignette about each band or person or aspect of the industry. But when taken as a whole, “Ripped” reads more like a cautionary tale with a hopeful ending.

“Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”